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The Dutch former Colonies

Ceylon

Ceylon, sri lanka, galle, fort, voc

Galle Fort

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Ruwanwella
The Dutch first landed in Ceylon in 1602, it was then under Portuguese control. Between 1636 and 1658 they managed to oust the Portuguese, initially at the invitation of local rulers. The Portuguese had ruled the coastline, though not the interior, of the island from 1505 to 1658. Buddhists, Hindus and Muslims had all suffered religious persecution under Portuguese rule; the Dutch were more interested in trade than in religious converts. The VOC proved unable to extend its control into the interior and only controlled coastal provinces. Ceylon remained a major Dutch trading post throughout the VOC period. Ceylon's importance came from it being a half-way point between their settlements in Indonesia and South Africa. The island itself was a source of cinnamon and elephants, which were sold to Indian princes. In 1796 the British seized control of the Dutch positions, at the urging of the ruler of Kandy. It was formally ceded in the treaty of Amiens.

Time Line

1505 - Galle Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, was first set up by the Portuguese as a trading station in 1505. Later it was taken by the Dutch who built a fort with 300 houses and shops inside the walls, all still standing. The Dutch passed off to the British for the last 100 years of the colonial period, so the French couldn't get Ceylon

1602 - In 1602, the Dutch appeared in the east. They assumed to aid the people of Ceylon against the oppression of the Portuguese, and succeeded in gaining a footing on the island. They soon expelled the Portuguese. If the Dutch are fairly dealt with in history, they were very uncomfortable friends to the poor people of Ceylon, who were driven on to the highlands in the interior, while the Dutch possessed the fertile lowlands which border all around on the coast. Ceylon abounds in rich ...

1656 - An example, on a large scale, of the disastrous results of employing political methods of spreading Christianity is afforded by the religious history of Ceylon. When the Dutch took over from the Portuguese the island of Ceylon in 1656, they attempted to force a Protestant form of Christianity upon its inhabitants by subjecting Buddhists, Hindus, and Eomanists who were not prepared to embrace Protestantism, to heavy civil disabilities.

1658 - The Dutch invaded Ceylon (Sri Lanka) in 1658 and was dominant for 140 years Again the Dutch were not able to capture the kingdom of Kandy. History says the Dutch like the Portuguese tried, but they were not successful.

1690 - But before speaking of this new king, I will briefly glance at the history of coffee in Ceylon. To begin with, it is a singular fact that not only a very large proportion of all the coffee that once clothed these thousand hills in Ceylon, but also the coffee plantations of many other lands are all lineally descended from one plant, which, about AD 1690,. was raised in a garden at Batavia by the Dutch governor, General Van Hoorne, to whom a few seeds had been presented by a trader ...

1766 - Before the Kandian war, which terminated in 1766, the Dutch annually exported from Ceylon from 8000 to 10000 bales of cinnamon, each weighing 86 Ib. Dutch, or about 92i English. This war, which was very unfortunate for the King- of Kandy, was extremely expensive to the Dutch. The,chief advantage they obtained was the entire possession of the harbours and coasts round the island.

1795 - In 1795 the British dispossessed the Dutch, and Ceylon has been from that time to our own days under the direct government of the English Crown. It might have seemed that warnings had been written with terrible distinctness upon the face of that twice-conquered ...

1815 - English history records that the whole island, by the invitation of the natives, was taken possession of, in 1815, by the British crown, under the sovereignty of which Ceylon still remains.

An interesting site about Dutch Ships wrecks :   http://cf.hum.uva.nl/galle/avondster/story.html
Nice site over Galle :       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galle_fort
 

Ceylon, sri lanka,  voc, map

Ceylon

Ceylon, sri lanka,  voc, map

Ceylon 1724

Ceylon, sri lanka,  voc, kandi

 

Ceylon, sri lanka,  voc, kandy

Queen-in-Kandy--1830

 

Previous
Colombo
Batticaloa
Galle
Jaffna
Kalpitya
Kalutara
Mannar
Trincomalee
Small Forts